MediaSmarts on Games and Quizzes

MediaSmarts on Games and Quizzes

Educational computer games that introduce kids to key ideas in media and digital literacy. These games are a great way to start a conversation on media issues in the home or classroom, and you can play most of them right here on our website.

This interactive module for Grades 7 and 8 is designed to increase students’ ability to recognize bias, prejudice and hate propaganda on the Internet and in other media. Learn More >

 

This interactive unit is designed to help kids between the ages of 5 and 8 recognize the marketing techniques used on commercial websites that target children. Learn More >

The three CyberPigs learn some important lessons about authenticating online information and observing rules of netiquette. They also learn how to distinguish between fact and opinion and how to recognize bias and harmful stereotyping in online content.  Learn More >

Developed in partnership with CIRA, this interactive quiz is designed to increase students’ knowledge of the cyber security risks they face every day. Learn More >

This interactive online module takes students through a CyberTour of twelve mock websites to test their savvy surfing skills. Learn More >

This interactive tutorial teaches students the critical thinking skills they need to apply to their online experiences, including online safety, authenticating online information, recognizing online marketing ploys, protecting their privacy, managing online relationships and dealing with cyberbullying. Learn More >

This tutorial introduces children, ages 7-9, to the concept of online privacy and teaches them to distinguish between information that is appropriate to give out and information better kept private – and to recognize how this may change in different contexts. Learn More >

In this game, designed for ages 8-10, the CyberPigs play on their favourite website and encounter marketing ploys, spam and a close encounter with a not-too-friendly wolf. Learn More >

This tutorial aims to teach students essential digital literacy skills through simulating their favourite online experiences. Learn More >

This interactive narrated tutorial teaches students about the benefits and drawbacks of sharing information online. Students give their opinion about what the characters in the story should do about their privacy dilemmas, from posting photos to buying music online, and they receive feedback on their responses as the story unfolds. Learn More >

This interactive quiz, for Grades 6 to 8, is designed to increase students’ knowledge and understanding of alcohol marketing aimed at youth. Learn More >

Cloud Computing from “How Stuff Works”

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A typical cloud computing system. See more computer networking pictures.

In a cloud computing system, there’s a significant workload shift. Local computers no longer have to do all the heavy lifting when it comes to running applications. The network of computers that make up the cloud handles them instead. Hardware and software demands on the user’s side decrease. The only thing the user’s computer needs to be able to run is the cloud computing system’s interface software, which can be as simple as a Web browser, and the cloud’s network takes care of the rest.

There’s a good chance you’ve already used some form of cloud computing. If you have an e-mail account with a Web-based e-mail service like Hotmail, Yahoo! Mail or Gmail, then you’ve had some experience with cloud computing. Instead of running an e-mail program on your computer, you log in to a Web e-mail account remotely. The software and storage for your account doesn’t exist on your computer — it’s on the service’s computer cloud.

Carnegie Cyber Academy Games and Lessons

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Using the Game: The Teacher’s Companion

Teacher's Companion

The Teacher’s Companion gives educators an introduction to The MySecureCyberspace Game and Academy Web site and 13 lesson starters to help them get started with the game in the classroom.

Each lesson starter contains terminology, background information and classroom activities, as well as an outline of learning objectives and learning objective outcomes, and corresponding standards from the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS).

For best printing results, print double-sided.