January 15th, 2019

January 14/15

  1. Comparison/Contrast Essay
    1. Pre-write – Class work
    2. Rough Draft – Quiz
  2. Mid-term Essay next class – Next class, you will be writing a three or four paragraph essay on characters from something you have read in school. Take some time before next class to think about (or research) the characters from the short stories we read this year or characters from a novel or play you read last year. This essay will count as a quiz grade for the second grading period.

January 11th, 2019

January 10/11

  1. Review Sentence Structures – We reviewed the answers for the class work.
  2. Comparison/Contrast Essay – We compare objects (or people) to see how they are alike; we contrast them to see how they are different. We usually write a comparison and contrast essay to PROVE that one subject is better than another in certain ways!
    1. We could compare and contrast two different pets: a dog and a cat.
      1. Protection:
        1. Dogs offer protection from strangers by barking or biting.
        2. Cats protect themselves by hissing, clawing, or biting.
      2. Cleanliness:
        1. Dogs are dirty and they often smell bad. Owners have to bathe them.
        2. Cats clean themselves.
      3.  Companionship
        1. A dog will stay by your side and will look at you with love even when you do something stupid!
        2. A cat will occasionally sit with you for a few minutes until it suddenly has to chase an imaginary object down the hall. A cat almost always looks at you like you have done something stupid.
  1. Pre-write – Class work – Your turn: Pick two subjects to compare and contrast through three features. You cannot write about dogs, cats, or any pets!
  2. Rough Draft – Quiz – Choose either the block method or point-by-point method.

Block Method

I. Introduction

II. Subject 1

Feature 1

Feature 2

Feature 3

III. Subject 2

Feature 1

Feature 2

Feature 3

IV. Conclusion

Point-by-Point Method

I. Introduction

II. Feature 1

Subject  1

Subject 2

III. Feature 2

Subject  1

Subject 2

IV. Feature 3

Subject  1

Subject 2

IV. Conclusion

  1. The introduction explains what you are comparing and contrasting and the features you will use. Include your thesis statement.  For example: Dogs are better pets than cats for protection and companionship.
  2. The conclusion summarizes the points you have made through your in-depth analysis of the subjects and their features.
  3. Double space the essay! Write in a formal voice! Try to vary your sentences so you have all four sentence structures. Write at least thirty sentences total.

 

 

January 9th, 2019

January 8/9

  1. Sentence Structures (This is a class work) – double-space the sentences – label all the subjects and verbs, label all the clauses, and label each sentence structure.
    1. Organizing the rummage sale, the Key Club requested donations from everyone at school.
    2. The club members accepted whatever was donated, but they welcomed housewares most.
    3. The principal donated a vacuum cleaner; the soccer coach contributed a set of dishes; and several of the teachers provided towels and sheets.
    4. The club sold almost everything that had been donated, and the members celebrated their success with pitchers of lemonade.
    5. Afterward, they gave all the profits that they had made from the sale to the city’s homeless shelter.
    6. The shelter’s employees were very grateful for the donations.
    7. They offered the members of the Key Club the chance to tour the facility.
    8. John took photos, and I interviewed both staff members and clients of the shelter.
    9. After we had finished our article, we took it to the editor of the school newspaper.
    10. The story was published in the next issue, and we received many compliments even though we hadn’t expected any praise.
  2. We also had a visit from Mr. Lomax about scheduling classes for next year. If you missed his presentation, see him for instructions.

January 7th, 2019

January 4/7

  1. Idiom Homework is due
  1. Notes – Sentence Parts
    1. Independent and Subordinate clauses
  1. Independent Clause – A word group that contains a subject and a verb and that form a complete thought.
  2. Subordinate Clause – A word group that contains a subject and a verb but does contain a complete thought.
  1. NotesSentence Structures
    1. Simple – One [independent] clause
  1. Example – The boy walked down the street.
  2. Example – The boy and girl walked down the street.
  • Example – The boy walked and ran down the street.
    1. Compound – Two or more [independent] clauses.
  1. Example – I wanted to leave early, but I had to stay for a meeting.
  2. Example – The student drove to Starbucks, and he bought an expensive coffee, but he left it on the hood of his car.
    1. Complex – One [independent] clause and at least one (subordinate) clause.
  1. Example – [Many people think (that hot air balloon rides are fun.)]
  2. Example – (Since my mother is afraid of heights), [she will not ride in a balloon.]
    1. Compound/Complex – At least two [independent] clauses and one (subordinate) clause.
  1. Example – (Although he fell from the ladder),[ the carpenter did not hurt himself,] and [he climbed up again.]
  2. [The man (who stole my sandwich) upset me]; therefore, [I poisoned him!]
  1. Sentence Structure Practice
    1. The man who taught me guitar showed me how to read music.
  1. The old woman lived in a house beside the giant tree.
  2. Brown bought a ladder which was ten-feet tall, and

then he cleaned his gutters.

  1. We will fly to Barcelona, and we will eat tapas.
  2. Since Jasmine won the lottery, she bought ten cars

and two houses.

 

 

January 3rd, 2019

January 2/3

  1. Idioms and Euphemisms – An idiom is figurative language used to mean something other than its literal meaning. Idioms are shorthand for a longer message members of a group want to use. A euphemism is a polite way to say something that is unpleasant.
  2. Homework – Chose any five of the idioms on the sheet. First write the idiom, and then write an explanation of the meaning and origin of each of the five phrases.

December 20th, 2018

December 19/20

  1. Diagramming Sentences
  2. Have a good winter break.

December 18th, 2018

December 17/18

I.Grammar Test

II.Notes on Diagramming Sentences – See PowerPoint here: 121718 Notes

December 14th, 2018

December 13/14

  1. Review Prepositional Phrases CW
  2. Grammar Practice
    1. Double space the sentences below and label the parts of the sentence: s, hv, av, lv, io, do, pa, pn.  Also underline prepositional phrases.
    2. Note: Parts of the sentence will never be in a prepositional phrase!
      1. The rules of Monopoly sound complicated.
      2. The Redskins and the Chargers played football yesterday.
      3. Some people grow vegetables in their gardens.
      4. Always wash your dishes after dinner.
      5. The large yellow flowers smell nice.
      6. Many people from the southern states enjoy iced tea with their meals.
      7. Two of my brothers were born in Virginia.
      8. The man in the car may have been watching the game on his phone.
      9. There are many flowers in the yard.
      10. Inside the hotel safe, the millionaire kept her cash and jewelry.
    3. Grammar Test Prep Handout – click here for the answers: Grammar Test Prep 2018 Key
    4. Grammar Test next class

December 12th, 2018

December 11/12

  1. Notes on Prepositional Phrases
    1. A phrase is a group of related words that is used as a single part of speech. It does not contain both a subject and a verb.
    2. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun at the end is called the object of the preposition (op).
    3. Commonly-used prepositions: about, above, across, at, before, beneath, by, down, during, for, from, in, like, near, of, on, over, through, to, toward, under, up, with
    4. An adjective phrase is a prepositional phrase that describes a noun or a pronoun.
      1. Ex/ A bowl of cherries
      2. “of cherries” describes the “bowl”
    5. An adverb phrase is a prepositional phrase that describes a verb, adjective, or
      1. Ex/ George ran down the hall.
      2. “down the hall” describes “ran”
  2. Prepositional Phrases CW – Double-space the sentences, underline the prepositional phrases, circle and label the words the phrases describe, and then label the phrases: adj ph or adv ph.
    1. The porters hiked toward the summit.
    2. The chicken walked across the road.
    3. No one in the class has seen the movie yet.
    4. During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset.
    5. The coconut palms in the park near the bay were planted a long time ago.
    6. Tamara and Dawn floated down the river on a raft.
    7. Beneath the waves, the ocean is calm.
    8. Julius Caesar was one of the most successful generals in ancient Rome.
    9. The picture of their candidate in today’s newspaper is not at all flattering.
    10. We ordered a dish of salsa and a basket of tortilla chips.
  3. Grammar Practice – In your notes, label the parts of the sentence: s, hv, av, lv, io, do, pa, pn. Also, underline and label the prepositional phrases: adj ph, adv ph.
    1. The rules of Monopoly sound complicated.
    2. The Redskins and the Chargers played football yesterday.
    3. Some people grow vegetables in their gardens.
    4. Always wash your dishes after dinner.
    5. The large yellow flowers smell nice.
    6. Many people from the southern states enjoy iced tea with their meals.
    7. Two of my brothers were born in Virginia.
    8. The man in the car may have been watching the game on his phone.
    9. There are many flowers in the yard.
    10. Inside the hotel safe, the millionaire kept her cash and jewelry.

 

 

December 10th, 2018

December 7/10

  1. Homework is due
  2. Class work is due
  3. Poetry Test

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