November 20th, 2017

November 20-22

  1. Class Discussion – We discussed the devices and themes of the following poems:
    1. “ Ex-Basketball Player” pg 776
    2. “Those Winter Sundays” pg 256
    3. “The Gift” pg 254
    4. “The Fish” pg 796
    5. “Mending Wall” pg 890
  2. Poetry Analysis Class work
    1. Class work assignment: Choose one of the poems:
    2. Write a single-spaced page (formal voice) in which you explain one theme of the poem. Also, demonstrate (using quotes) how the poet used at least five different poetic devices to create a good poem.
      1. For example, you might write, “Robert Frost uses a metaphor in the line, ‘Spring is the mischief in me.’” This metaphor shows that people cause trouble in spring.
  3. Homework – Read “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” on page 880. Write a paragraph of at least five sentences to explain the main theme of the poem. You may describe the refrains, alliteration, and imagery Whitman uses to create the poem and its theme.

November 20th, 2017

November 15-17

  1. Review Poetry Terms – We reviewed the definitions of the poetry terms, and I gave examples.
  2. Group Work – Poems
    1. “Ex-Basketball Player” pg 776 , “Those Winter Sundays” pg 256, “The Gift” pg 254, “The Fish” pg 796, “Mending Wall” pg 890
    2. In your notes, write down the title and page of each poem, and then write a brief description of the poem (one poem per page). Write one theme for each poem.
    3. Identify at least four devices the poet used in each poem. For example, John Updike uses personification in the poem “Ex-Basketball Player,” so you should write,  Personification – “Their rubber elbows hanging loose and low” (9).

November 14th, 2017

November 13/14

  1. Parts of the Sentence Review
  2. Parts of the Sentence Quiz
  3. Poetry Terms – Use the reference section of the Literature textbook (R102 – 114), to define these terms
    1. Alliteration
    2. Analogy
    3. Blank Verse
    4. Diction
    5. Free Verse
    6. Hyperbole
    7. Iambic Pentameter
    8. Imagery
    9. Lyric poetry
    10. Metaphor
    11. Meter
    12. Mood
    13. Narrative Poetry
    14. Personification
    15. Refrain
    16. Simile
    17. Speaker
    18. Stanza
    19. Tone
    20. Voice
  4. Poems – Read the following poems to prepare for next class:
    1. “ Ex-Basketball Player” pg 776
    2. “Those Winter Sundays” pg 256
    3. “The Gift” pg 254
    4. “The Fish” pg 796
    5. “Mending Wall” pg 890

November 14th, 2017

November 8/9

  1. Homework is due
  2. Prepositional Phrases Notes
    1. A phrase is a group of related words that is used as a single part of speech. It does not contain both a subject and a verb.
    2. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun at the end is called the object of the preposition (op).
    3. Commonly-used prepositions: about, above, across, at, before, beneath, by, down, during, for, from, in, like, near, of, on, over, through, to, toward, under, up, with
    4. An adjective phrase is a prepositional phrase that describes a noun or a pronoun.
      1. Ex/ A bowl of cherries
      2. “of cherries” describes the “bowl”
    5. An adverb phrase is a prepositional phrase that describes a verb, adjective, or
      1. Ex/ George ran down the hall.
      2. “down the hall” describes “ran”
  3. Prepositional Phrases Class work – Double space the sentences, put parentheses around the prepositional phrases, underline and label the modified words, and then label the phrase. See examples below:
    1. The porters hiked toward the summit.
    2. The chicken walked across the road.
    3. No one in the class has seen the movie yet.
    4. During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset.
    5. The coconut palms in the park near the bay were planted a long time ago.
    6. Tamara and Dawn floated down the river on a raft.
    7. Beneath the waves, the ocean is calm.
    8. Julius Caesar was one of the most successful generals in ancient Rome.
    9. The picture of their candidate in today’s newspaper is not flattering.
    10. We ordered a dish of salsa and a basket of tortilla chips.
  4. Subjects, Verbs, and Complements review
  5. Quiz next class on Parts of the Sentence.
pro               adj ph n       adj ph
Many (of the students) enjoy eating chicken wings (for lunch.)
    v    adv ph               n         adj ph
I parked the car (near the tree) (in the field.)
   v                  adv ph            adv ph
She walked (over the river) and (through the woods)
              adv ph
(to her grandmother’s house).

 

November 3rd, 2017

November 3/6

  1. Subjects, Verbs, and Complements practice –
    1. Use the following labels: s, av, lv, hv, pn, pa, do, io.
    2. Double-space the sentences.
      1. After lunch, the students grew tired.
      2. Bibbo is helpful to all the students.
      3. Several of the people did watch the beginning of the show.
      4. Copeland gave the students a quiz during the second week of school.
      5. During his speeches, President Obama seems highly intelligent.
      6. Cintron grew tomatoes in his garden.
      7. There were sixty-five questions on the test.
      8. Jonah is a tall and athletic boy.
      9. Kiara fed the horse some oats and molasses.
      10. Behind the church, a group of children play every day.
  2. Homework – (This is available on the Google Classroom!)
    1. Double-space the sentences. Label all subjects, verbs, and complements. (s, hv, lv, av, do, io, pa, pn)
      1. All of the students have given me their homework.
      2. The alarm sounded loud and clear.
      3. The quarterback threw the ball twenty yards.
      4. Baxter will feed his dog a steak every day.
      5. A few of the soldiers are officers.
    2. (Twenty of the words will be labeled.)

November 1st, 2017

November 1/2

  1. Exam Essay – This must be completed in class.

October 31st, 2017

October 30/31

  1. Action and Linking Verbs
    1. Action verbs express a physical or mental action:
      1. shout, jump, run, think, believe, guess
        1. The dog ran to the front yard.
        2. Jones always thinks about money.
      2. Linking verbs connect the subject to a word or word group that identifies or describes the subject:
        1. am, is, was, became, grow, feel, seem
          1. O’Leary is the principal.
          2. Some of the students feel
  2. Class work – Action and Linking Verbs – grow, smell, feel, sound, appear, look, stay, taste, turn, remain
    1. Choose any five of the verbs above, and use each first as a action verb in a sentence, and then use the same verb as an linking verb.
      1. Example:
        1. Wilson grew tomatoes in his garden. Action
        2. The students grew sleepy as they read the story. Linking
      2. Notes on Complements –
        1. Complements complete the meaning of action or linking verbs. They answer “who” or “what” after the verb.
        2. Action Verbs may have direct and indirect objects.
          1. The indirect object will always appear between the verb and the direct object.
            1. Ex/ Becca fed the horse some oats.
            2. I threw him the ball.
          2. A direct object (DO) answers “who” or “what” after the action verb.
          3. An indirect object (IO) answers “to whom” or “to what” after the verb. The IO always appears between the verb and the DO.
    2. Linking verbs may be completed by a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective.
        1. Ex/ Mr. O’Leary is the principal.
        2. Ex/ Mrs. Bibbo seems nice.
        3. A predicate nominative (PN) is a noun or pronoun that identifies the subject.
        4. A predicate adjective (PA) is an adjective that describes the subject.
    3. Subjects, Verbs, and Complements practice – Use the following labels: s, av, lv, hv, pn, pa, do, io.   Double-space the sentences.
  1. After lunch, the students grew tired.
  2. Bibbo is helpful to all the students.
  3. Several of the people did watch the beginning of the show.
  4. Copeland gave the students a quiz during the second week of school.
  5. During his speeches, President Obama seems highly intelligent.
  6. Cintron grew tomatoes in his garden.
  7. There were sixty-five questions on the test.
  8. Jonah is a tall and athletic boy.
  9. Kiara fed the horse some oats and molasses.
  10. Behind the church, a group of children play every day.

October 31st, 2017

October 26/27

  1. Literary Criticism Final Draft – This assignment must be completed in school on our Google classroom.

October 31st, 2017

October 24/25

  1. Group work: Themes
    1. For each of the four stories, your group will write 6 to 8 theme topics and at least two new themes.
    2. “Everyday Use” 48
    3. “To Build a Fire” 78
    4. “The Bass, the River, and Sheila Mant” 31
    5. “Harrison Bergeron” 36
  2. Archetypal Characters and Stories
    1. See attached document: Literary Archetypes

October 20th, 2017

October 20/23

  1. Literary Criticism Rough Draft – Students finished writing their Literary Criticism Rough Drafts.
    1. The draft should follow the outline.
    2. It must be double spaced.
    3. It should be written in a formal voice.
    4. It counts as a quiz grade.

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